GUADALUPE


GUADALUPE, town in Castile, W. Spain. Jewish landowners are recorded there in the second half of the 14th century. The community was annihilated in the wave of anti-Jewish riots which swept Spain in 1391, but was revived during the 15th century. In 1485, however, Jews were forbidden to live in Guadalupe by order of Nuño de Arévalo, the local inquisitor. In 1492, prior to the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, veedores (leaders) of the community sold the land of the old cemetery to the local bishop for 400 reals; a clause in the deed of sale states that the price was so low because of the kindnesses shown to the Jewish community by the bishop. The *Conversos in Guadalupe lived on a special street in the former Jewish quarter. Jews from Trujillo would stay at the homes of these Conversos, which became important centers for fulfilling the Jewish observances. Forty-six dossiers, almost all of 1485, are preserved concerning persons arraigned before a special tribunal sent by the Toledo Inquisition to uncover relapsed Conversos. Several Conversos who had entered the monastery of San Bartholomé de Lupiana near Guadalupe were tried there in 1489–90. The monks Diego de Marchena and García Çapata, whose conversion to Judaism caused a furor in the church in Spain, belonged to this monastery. They were burned at the stake as Jews.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

A. Sicroff, in: Studies… U.J. Benardete (1965), 89–125; H. Beinart, in: Tarbiz, 26 (1956/57), 78; idem, in: Scripta Hierosolymitana, 7 (1961), 167–92; F. Fita, in: Boletín de la Academia de Historia, 23 (1893), 283; E. Escobar, in: El Monasterio de Guadalupe, 1 (1916), 62; Suárez Fernández, Documentos, index; Baer, Urkunden, index; Baer, Spain, index.

[Haim Beinart]


Source: Encyclopaedia Judaica. © 2008 The Gale Group. All Rights Reserved.