Americans Feel Closest To England, Canada and Israel

(November 30, 2006)


American voters have developed warmer feelings about several nations around the world, according to a Quinnipiac University Global Thermometer survey released November 30, 2006. England, Canada and Israel remained the nations generating the warmest feelings among Americans. Americans' warmth toward China, India and Israel grew the most.

“Israel's rating of 68.2 is a substantial increase since the last survey, and even more impressive when compared to its rating of 62.9 in the June poll, which was before its war with Hizballah in Lebanon,” said Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute..

The Global Thermometer, which measures the warmth of American voters' feelings toward a list of foreign nations, on a scale of 0 - 100, found that the ratings for 13 nations increased since the August 28 survey by the independent Quinnipiac University poll. The view of one nation remained the same, and three - all nations commonly thought of as trouble spots for the United States - found that Americans had a chillier view of them.

Iran and North Korea remain at the bottom of the rankings. North Korea, Iraq and Venezuela were the nations whose ratings fell, but all were still ranked above the Palestinian government, which was 15th out of the 18 countries ranked..

The nations and the mean score of the warmth of American voters' attitudes, and in parentheses the mean score from August 28 are:

1) England - 78.9 (78.3)

2) Canada - 73.4 (71.7)

3) Israel - 68.2 (65.9)

4) Germany - 58.1 (first time included)

5) India - 56.6 (53.4)

6) Mexico - 51.4 (51.4)

7) United Nations - 50.4 (49.2)

8) Russia - 46.2 (45.5)

9) France - 44.6 (43.2)

10) China - 44.2 (39)

11) Saudi Arabia - 40.4 (38.2)

12) Venezuela - 30.9 (35.9)

13) Iraq - 25.9 (27.7)

14) Syria - 24.3 (21.7)

15) Palestinian Government - 23.8 (22.8)

16) Cuba - 24.1 (24)

17) Iran - 15.5 (13.9)

18) North Korea - 13.5 (15)


Source: Quinnipiac University Polling Institute