Albert Einstein on Zionism


“Zionism springs from an even deeper motive than Jewish suffering. It is rooted in a Jewish spiritual tradition whose maintenance and development are for Jews the basis of their continued existence as a community.” (Manchester Guardian, October 12, 1929)

“Long before the emergence of Hitler I made the cause of Zionism mine because through it I saw a means of correcting a flagrant wrong.” (Letter to Jawaharlal Nehru, Prime Minister of India, June 13, 1947)

“The Jewish people alone has for centuries been in the anomalous position of being victimized and hounded as a people, though bereft of all the rights and protections which even the smallest people normally has...Zionism offered the means of ending this discrimination. Through the return to the land to which they were bound by close historic ties...Jews sought to abolish their pariah status among peoples.” (Letter to Jawaharlal Nehru, Prime Minister of India, June 13, 1947)

“Can Jewish need, no matter how acute, be met without the infringement of the vital rights of others? My answer is in the affirmative. One of the most extraordinary features of the Jewish rebuilding of Palestine is that the influx of Jewish pioneers has resulted not in the displacement and impoverishment of the local Arab population, but in its phenomenal increase and greater prosperity.” (Letter to Jawaharlal Nehru, Prime Minister of India, June 13, 1947)

Regarding “the nature of [the] Arab opposition. Though the Arab of Palestine has benefited...economically, he wants exclusive national sovereignty, such as is enjoyed by the Arabs of Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Lebanon and Syria [sic]. It is a legitimate and natural desire, and justice would seem to call for its satisfaction.” But at the end of the first world war, the Allies gave the Arabs 99% of the “vast, underpopulated territories” liberated from the Turks to satisfy their national aspirations and five independent Arab states were established. One percent was reserved for the Jews “in the land of their origin.” “In the august scale of justice, which weighs need against need, there is no doubt as to whose is more heavy.” What the Jews were allotted in the Balfour Declaration “redresses the balance” of justice and history. Brush aside “the rivalries of power politics and the egotism of petty nationalist appetites” and support “the glorious renascence which has begun in Palestine.” (Letter to Jawaharlal Nehru, Prime Minister of India, June 13, 1947)