TAUSSIG, FRANK WILLIAM


TAUSSIG, FRANK WILLIAM (1859–1940), U.S. economist, born in St. Louis, Missouri. Taussig's father was an immigrant from Prague, who had become president of a successful railroad company, and his mother was a daughter of a Protestant teacher from the Rhineland. In 1885 Taussig began a teaching career at Harvard, where he became professor of economics in 1901. He served as the first chairman of the United States Tariff Commission in Washington from 1917 to 1919 and was a close adviser to President Wilson.

Taussig's principal field was the theory, history, and practice of international trade and trade policy. His major work Principles of Economics (1911) was for many years a standard textbook. Other writings include The Tariff History of the United States (1888), Wages and Capital (1896), and International Trade (1927).

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

J.A. Schumpeter, Ten Great Economists From Marx to Keynes (1951), 191–221.

[Joachim O. Ronall]


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