NEUBERG, GUSTAV EMBDEN CARL


NEUBERG, GUSTAV EMBDEN CARL (1877–1956), German biochemist. Born in Hanover, Neuberg joined the Pathological Institute of the University of Berlin, becoming professor in 1919, and from 1920 directed the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Biochemistry, Berlin-Dahlem. The Nazis dismissed him in 1938, and he went to Amsterdam. In 1939–40 he was professor of biochemistry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In 1941 he went to America, was professor at New York University until 1950, and then for a time visiting professor at Brooklyn Polytechnic. Neuberg's field of research was principally in sugars, albumen, fermentation processes, the biochemical action of light, and glycerin substitutes. He was an honorary member of ten national academies of science, the recipient of many honorary doctorates, prizes, and medals.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Experimental Medicine and Surgery, 5 (1947), 100–6, incl. bibl.; A. Auhagen, in: Zeitschrift fuer Naturforschung, 4 pt. B (1949), 245; Chemical and Engineering News, 25 (1947), 3358.

[Samuel Aaron Miller]


Source: Encyclopaedia Judaica. © 2008 The Gale Group. All Rights Reserved.