LUBACZOW


LUBACZOW (Pol. Łubaczów), town in Rzeszow province, S.E. Poland. Jews are mentioned in Lubaczow as early as 1498. When confirming the municipal rights of the town in 1523, King Sigismund I granted a privilege according to which the Jews were forbidden to trade in the surrounding villages. In 1562 only two Jewish houses were mentioned in Lubaczow; there were three Jewish houses in the first half of the 17th century, but in 1662 there were no Jews at all, probably a result of the Swedish wars and the wars against the Cossacks (in 1655 the town was burned down by the Cossacks). In 1717 the Jews of Lubaczow paid 560 zlotys poll tax, 425 in 1719, and 500 in 1721; in addition they were to pay the king a yearly "kettle tax" of 1,200 zlotys, and for cattle slaughtering the shoulder blade duty (łopatkowe). In 1765 the community of Lubaczow together with the townlet of Potylicz and surrounding villages numbered 687 poll tax payers. In 1880 the community numbered 1,503 (34% of the total population), 1,911 in 1900, 2,171 in 1910, and 1,715 (32%) in 1921. At that time Lubaczow had 106 Jewish workshops, 33 of which had salaried workers.

Holocaust Period

Before the outbreak of World War II there were about 2,300 Jews in Lubaczow. The majority of them were deported in the autumn of 1942 to *Belzec death camp. The remaining Jews were exterminated on Jan. 6, 1943. After the war, the Jewish community of Lubaczow was not reconstituted.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

J. Kleczyński and F. Kluczycki, Liczba głow żydowskich w Koronie z taryf 1765 r. (1898); A. Prochaska, Materyały archiwalne (1899), no. 217; E. Heller (ed.), Żydowskie przedsiębiorstwa przemysłowe w Polsce…, 6 (1923); B. Wasiutyński, Ludność żydowska w Polsce… (1930), 114; Yad Vashem Archives.

[Raphael Mahler]


Source: Encyclopaedia Judaica. © 2008 The Gale Group. All Rights Reserved.