GÁBOR (originally Lederer), IGNÁC


GÁBOR (originally Lederer), IGNÁC (1868–1944), Hungarian philologist. Born in Abaujkomlos, Gábor studied at the Budapest rabbinical seminary and at the universities of Budapest and Paris, where he specialized in Semitic and Indo-European philology. His research was confined mainly to the theory of rhythm, and he translated medieval Hebrew poetry and various Sanskrit, Norse, French, Italian, Dutch, and other works into Hungarian. He initiated the "Popular Jewish Library," and edited a French-language newspaper, Le Progrès (1896–99). His works include a translation into Hungarian of the 13th-century Icelandic Poetic Edda (1905); Manoello élete és költészete ("Poems and Life of Imanuel of Rome," 1922); A magyar ritmus problémája ("The Problem of Rhythm in Hungarian," 1925); and Der hebraeische Urrhytmus (1929). Gábor and most of his family died in the Holocaust at the end of 1944.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Magyar Zsidó Lexikon (1929), 302; Magyar Irodalmi Lexikon, 1 (1963), 375.

[Baruch Yaron]


Source: Encyclopaedia Judaica. © 2008 The Gale Group. All Rights Reserved.