Truman Statment on the Anglo-American Committee of Injury

(April 30, 1946)


I AM VERY HAPPY that the request which I made for the immediate admission of 100,000 Jews into Palestine has been unanimously endorsed by the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry. The transference of these unfortunate people should now be accomplished with the greatest dispatch.

The protection and safe-guarding of the Holy places in Palestine sacred to Christian and Jew is adequately provided the report. One of the significant features in the report is that it aims to insure complete protection to the Arab population of Palestine by guaranteeing their civil and religious rights, and by recommending measures for the constant improvement in their cultural, educational and economic position.

I am also pleased that the Committee recommends in effect the abrogation of the White Paper of 1939 including existing restrictions on immigration and land acquisition to permit the further development of the Jewish National Home. It is also gratifying that the report envisages the carrying out of large scale economic development projects in Palestine which would facilitate further immigration and be of benefit to the entire population.

In addition to these immediate objectives the report deals with many other questions of long range political policies and questions of international law which require careful study and which I will take under advisement.

NOTE: The President's request for the admission of 100,000 Jews into Palestine was made in a letter dated August 31, 1945, to Prime Minister Artlee (see 1945 volume, this series, p. 469).

The report, released with the President's statement, is printed in Senate Document 182 (79th Cong., 2d sess.).

On May 3 the White House made public a letter to the President from the American members of the Executive of the Jewish Agency expressing profound satisfaction with the Committee's action and pledging cooperation in carrying out the program.


Source: Public Papers of the President