Arrow Intercepts Missile In Test

(July 29, 2004)

The Arrow Anti-Ballistic Missile System successfully intercepted and destroyed an incoming Scud missile in the seventh test of the complete Arrow system. The test was part of the ongoing Arrow System Improvement Program carried out by the United States and Israel. The objectives of the test were to demonstrate the Arrow system's improved performance against a target that represents a threat to Israel. The missile was launched from a maritime platform.

The test was conducted at the Point Mugu Sea Range in California. The U.S. navy fired a Scud, with its warhead removed, and the missile was tracked by the Arrow's “Green Pine” radar, which was stationed in Los Angeles. An Arrow-2 missile fired from another island and flying at nine times the speed of sound, collided with the Scud in midair.

The Arrow is designed to detect and destroy incoming missiles within three minutes. Interception takes place at altitudes of more than 30 miles so that the fallout from an unconventional warhead should disperse harmlessly.

Israel Aircraft Industries/MLM Division is the prime contractor for the Arrow. The system also includes the “Green Pine” Fire control Radar (FCR), developed by ELTA systems, the “Citron Tree” Battle Management Center (BMC), developed by Tadiran Systems, and the “Hazelnut Tree” Launch Control Center (LCC), operational launcher and interceptors developed by MLM. Other components made by IAI, IMI, and Rafael participated in the test.

The test was considered an importat step in proving the system's operational ability to respond to the existing and growing threat of ballistic missiles in the region. The system continues to be refined to meet the challenge posed by increasingly sophisticated weapons being developed and deployed by Iran and other nations.

At least 200 Arrow missiles are now deployed at two Israeli air bases.

Sources: Israeli Ministry of Defense, (July 29, 2004); Jewish Telegraphic Agency, (August 1, 2004)