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Israel Society & Culture:
Israeli Law Enforcement


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In common with police forces around the world, the task of Israel's police is to maintain the quality of life by fighting crime, assisting the authorities in carrying out the law and enforcing traffic regulations, as well as providing guidance on preventive measures for the safety and protection of the population.

The police's principal mobile task force, the Border Guard, deals mainly with internal security problems and includes a special anti-terrorist unit. The frequency and threat of terrorist incidents led concerned citizens to request active participation in the protection of their communities. Thus, a volunteer civil guard was established (1974) to maintain neighborhood security units, including command centers, armed patrols and training programs.

In response to violent protests in East Jerusalem following Operation Protective Edge, the Israeli police force announced on October 21, 2014 that a special unit was being formed specifically to deal with protests and civil unrest in Jerusalem.  The unit will be tasked with tackling the vandalism and riots that occured in Jerusalem during 2014, which left 40% of Israel's light-rail trains damaged as well as the Temple Mount. 

The Israeli police force has a tumultuous relationship with the local Ethiopian community, and has often come under fire for their handling of incidents involving Ethiopian individuals. Over 1,000 Ethiopian Israelis staged a protest march in Jerusalem condemning police violence towards Ethiopians on April 30, 2015. As the initial protest went on violent clashes broke out, leading to the hospitalization of two officers and seven protestors, and the arrest of two Ethiopian protestors. The protests began after a video was released of two Israeli police officers violently beating an Ethiopian man, supposedly because the police were clearing the area due to suspicious activity and he refused to leave. Protests continued through the weekend of May 2, and over 40 protestors were arrested for instigating violence against the police. Protests took over Rabin square, and police had to use tear gas and pepper spray to disperse the crowd in certain instances. To view a video of these protests, click here. In a 2014 incident, a young Ethiopian man was tased and beaten unconscious by officers who suspected him of breaking into a home. The police took him to the local station and called his family but gave him little medical attention, and he died months later in what was ruled a suicide.


Sources: Israeli Foreign Ministry,
Sterman, Adiv. “Police to establish unit to combat Jerusalem riots,” Times of Israel (October 21, 2014)
Hasson, Nir. “Protesters, police clash at Ethiopian Israeli demo against police brutality,” Haaretz (May 1, 2015)
Seidler, Shirley. “Dozens injured in Ethiopian-Israeli protests against police brutality in Tel Aviv,” Haaretz (May 4, 2015)

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