German Measures Against Jews

(October 1943)


OFFICE OF STRATEGIC SERVICES

Reports on Greece

Report No. 11205
Early October

SUBJECT: German Measures Against Jews.

Source: Reliable

The persecution of the Jews, which during the Italian occupation had been avoided, has now started for good. Terrified, the Jews seek refuge and safety anywhere and are being led by the Chief Rabbi who disappeared some days ago with the catalogue of all the Jews in Athens.

Among others, the following orders were issued by the Germans regarding the Jews:

Jews are not allowed to change or leave their residence. Any Jew not complying with the order regarding registration will be shot. Anyone assisting Jews in any way will be sent to concentration camps. Sheltering Jews is strictly forbidden, and contravention of this order means a heavier penalty being inflicted.

Jews over 14 years old, are obliged to report daily to their registration offices.

Jews are not allowed to cross main streets and squares between 1700-0700 hours.

Both the Archbishop and the Government are intervening, but it is expected that their efforts will be fruitless. The Government also sent a memorandum to the German authorities regarding the Jews in Greece, extracts of which are the following:

Jews have become one with the Greek people. They have produced many poets and have repeatedly distinguished themselves on the field of battle.

They have distinguished themselves in military and judicial matters, and have handled delicate matters most conscientiously.

Greek history ignores anti-semitism and intends doing so now. The Greek Orthodox Church has always given protection to the Jewish minority, which is small in numbers and offers no racial or political obstacle.

The nature of the Greek people refuses to distinguish people by their races, and judges them only as individuals according to the teachings of the ancient and modern Greek intellectual world.

The enforcement of anti-Semitic measures in Greece would be contrary to the religious feelings of the people, and only very slight protective action is advocated if total repeal is impossible.


Source: "Documents: The Jews in Greece, 1941-1944: Eyewitness Accounts," by Alexandros Kitroeff, Journal of the Hellenic Diaspora, Vol. XII, No. #3, (Fall 1985)